Crowns and bridges

Care of crowns and bridges

While crowns and bridges can last a lifetime, they do sometimes come loose or fall out. The most important step you can take to ensure the longevity of your crown is to practice good oral hygiene. Keep your gums and teeth healthy by brushing with fluoride toothpaste twice a day and flossing daily. See your dentist regularly for checkups and professional cleanings.

To prevent damage to your new crown or bridge, avoid chewing hard foods, ice or other hard objects.

Procedure

All ceramic and porcelain fused to metal crowns can be matched to the color of your natural teeth. A bridge is mounted onto a space where teeth are missing and is attached onto adjacent teeth. These teeth, called abutments, serve as anchors for the bridge. As with crowns, you have a choice of materials for bridges. Your dentist can help you decide which is best for you, based on the location of the missing tooth (or teeth), its function, aesthetic considerations and cost.

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Crowns and bridges……To be continued

Bridges and crowns are fixed prosthetic devices that are cemented onto existing teeth or implants, by a dentist or prosthodontist. Crowns are used most commonly to entirely cover or “cap” a damaged tooth or cover an implant. Your dentist may recommend a crown to:

  • Replace a large filling when there isn’t enough tooth remaining
  • Protect a weak tooth from fracturing
  • Restore a fractured tooth
  • Attach a bridge
  • Cover a dental implant
  • Cover a discolored or poorly shaped tooth
  • Cover a tooth that has had root canal treatment
  • Gaps left by missing teeth eventually cause the remaining teeth to shift resulting in a bad bite. This can also lead to gum disease and TMJ disorders. Bridges are commonly used if you’re missing one or more teeth. They cover the space where the teeth are missing and are cemented to natural teeth or implants surrounding the space.

Types of Dental Crown Materials
There are four different types of materials used for dental crowns:

  1. All ceramic (porcelain-based).
  2. Porcelain fused to metal
  3. Base metal alloys

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Know more about Toothaches

Toothaches are one among the foremost common dental issues and are easily treated after proper diagnosis. the sooner that the toothache is diagnosed, the higher the prospect of saving the tooth.

Toothache Symptoms:-
Common toothache symptoms include the following:
• Sharp or throbbing pain within the tooth constantly, or when applying pressure to the tooth
• Swelling in or round the gums or jaw
• A fever or headache
• A bad taste, sometimes amid foul-tasting drainage and fluid

Prevention of toothaches:-

If the root exposure is not severe, try using a special toothpaste formulated for sensitive teeth that contains fluoride and other minerals.

The best way to manage root sensitivity and to prevent gum disease with a consistent oral health care program of twice-daily tooth brushing and daily flossing. Try a soft bristle toothbrush to avoid irritating your gums, which can increase the risk of root exposure and sensitivity.

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Toothaches……To be continued

Toothaches are one among the foremost common dental issues and are easily treated after proper diagnosis. The sooner that the toothache is diagnosed, the higher the prospect of saving the tooth.

Causes of Toothache:-

Toothaches have many causes, from gum disease to jaw clenching, but tooth root sensitivity can also cause a toothache.

The tooth root includes the lower two-thirds of the tooth, and it is usually buried in the jawbone. But when gum disease develops, the bacteria that cause the disease can also dissolve the bone around the tooth root. The combination of dissolved bone and receding gums means that more of the tooth root is exposed. Without protection from healthy gums and healthy bone, the root often becomes sensitive to hot and cold and to sour foods.In some cases, the sensitivity is so severe that you may avoid very hot, cold or sour foods.

Other common cause:-
Toothaches may result from a spread of causes, including the following:
• Tooth decay: the destruction or damage of the tooth, including the outer coating (enamel) or the inner layer (dentin) of the tooth
• Abscessed tooth: a tooth that has an infection in or around it
• Damaged filling: in some cases, an old amalgam filling must get replaced because it’s wearing out or chipped
• Gum infection: redness and soreness within the gums from improper oral hygiene or food stuck in gum tissue
• Grinding of teeth: the rear and forth movement of the upper and mandible that causes them to rub against one another
• Repetitive motion: a repeated action, like chewing gum, for long periods of your time

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Tongue thrust

 

There are several other potential causes for tongue thrust that begin in infancy. Some of these include:

  • Long-term sucking habits that influence the tongue’s movement, like sucking of the thumb, fingers, or tongue
  • Allergies accompanied by chronically swollen tonsils or adenoids
  • Tongue-tie, where the band of tissue beneath the tongue is tight or short
  • A swallowing pattern known as reverse swallow

Tongue thrust has a number of telltale signs that manifest in children who have developed the pattern. These can include:

  • Tongue is visible between the teeth. The tip of the tongue sticks out between the teeth, whether the child is resting, swallowing, or speaking.
  • Mouth breathing.
  • Inability to close the lips completely. This could be due to a structural abnormality or habit.
  • Open bite. This occurs when the front teeth don’t meet when the teeth are closed.
  • Slow, fast, or messy eating.
  • Speech impediment. Lisping of s and z sounds is common.

Treatment of Tongue thurst

Tongue thrust often corrects with time or at the age of 8-9 years. Self-correction is due to musculature Balance during swelling.

  • Orthodontic treatment can be carried out.
  • Speech therapy is indicated.
  • If an associated habit is present like thumb sucking than it must be treated first.
  • Training the tongue for correct swallow & posture.
  • Use of appliances to correct position of tongue.
  • Correction of Malocclusion.

Tongue-Thrust

 

Tongue thrust…..To be continued

Tongue thrust, also known as reverse swallow or deviate swallow, is a condition in which the tongue is pressed up against the teeth or between them while gulping. In many cases, this condition leads to the movement of the tongue incorrectly to the sides, instead of moving forward to the teeth. This improper positioning of the tongue can occur even as the tongue is at rest, and in this case, it will lie too far forward.

Types of Tongue Thrust

Tongue thrust is an orofacial myofunctional disorder (OMD), having many different types.

  • Unilateral thrust when the tongue pushes unilaterally to the sides between the back teeth during swallowing
  • Anterior thrust refers to the case when the upper incisors are extremely protruded and lower lip is pulled in by the lower lip.
  • Bilateral thrust, when the tongue pushes between the back teeth on both sides during swallowing. Large tongue can also be noted

Tongue thrust in babies

In babies who are breastfed or bottle-fed, tongue thrust is normal. As the child gets older, their swallowing and speaking pattern should evolve.

However, some types of bottle nipples — and prolonged use of a bottle — can lead to an abnormal tongue thrust that lasts past the infant stage and into early childhood.

Tongue-Thrust

TO BE CONTINUED…………….

 

 

 

 

Tooth Abfraction

 

abfraction

Abfraction lesions on teeth are small notches caused by stress (forces) on your teeth. Biting, chewing, clenching and grinding put pressure on your teeth. Over time, this pressure can cause cracks and splits in the outer layer of your teeth near the gum line. Such lesions are fairly common in adults. Older adults are especially likely to have them. They occur more often in the back teeth, called premolars and molars. But they can occur in the front teeth as well and appear as V-shaped or wedge-shaped notches.Abfraction lesions don’t usually hurt but if the deeper layers of the tooth are involved, sensitivity might occur. These lesions do not heal over time. Some may worsen, and if left untreated, can cause the tooth to fracture. In order to prevent this, your dentist might recommend fillings of these lesions. This will not only strengthen the tooth, but also decrease the sensitivity if present.

Tooth Abrasion

 

Tooth-Abrasion

Abrasion is the loss of tooth structure by mechanical forces from a foreign element. Brushing regularly is considered vital for healthy teeth and gums, but be warned, you cannot overdo a good thing. The people most at risk for tooth or gum damage from over-brushing are those who are very particular about their oral care but use faulty brushing techniques. Also in people who use medium- or hard-bristled toothbrushes or excessive pressure while brushing. Tooth abrasion can also be caused as a result of a combination of both these factors.

Vigorous brushing can wear down the enamel on the teeth as well as damage and push back the gums, exposing the sensitive root area. This can then lead to other dental problems such as gum disease and cavities on the roots of the teeth which may then require treatments such as fillings or root canals. To put it simply, brushing technique is vital to ensure cleanliness of teeth and you’re not going to achieve any extra benefit by brushing hard.

 

Supernumerary tooth

 

"Supernumerary premolar teeth may be defined as extra teeth occurring within thedental arch. It  can occur as singles, multiples, unilaterally or bilaterallyand in the maxilla, the mandible or both. Supernumerary premolar teeth in the mandible are rare.  Usually the teeth are unerupted and may have no effect on the developing dentition.However, in some cases they may lead to impaction, cyst development and root resorption of the adjacent permanent teeth."

A supernumerary tooth lying among, lingual to, or buccal to the maxillary or mandibular molars. Paramolar is a developmental anomaly and has been argued to arise from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Supernumerary teeth can be found in almost any region of the dental arch. They are most frequently located in the maxilla. The crowns of supernumerary teeth may show either a normal appearance or different atypical shapes and their roots may be completely or incompletely developed.

 

 

Know about Dental Implants

 

dental-implant

  • Anyone can get dental implants.

Fact: Not everyone require dental implants. For dental implants, it is important to have healthy bone tissue in the mouth for the implant. A qualified dentist can figure this out.

  • Dental implants are painful.

Fact: Under local anesthesia, the patient undergoes a very comfortable procedure.

  • Dental implant titanium causes migraine or headache.

Fact: There are no clinical studies which prove this. In addition to this, the headache felt after the procedure might be due to patients having TMJ disorder or opening mouth wide.

  • Dental implants are ineffective.

Fact: Dental implants have history of over forty years. And, the researches show that dental implants have approximately 95% success rate.

  • Dental implants are quite high-priced.

Fact: When you think about dental implants to restore your missing teeth, the initial investments provides huge benefits over a period of time compared to other treatment alternatives available.

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